Gallery Solace - Royal Navy losses 1915
Gallery Solace - The Great War 1914-1918
20130228000507!Logo of the Royal NavyROYAL NAVY LOSSES

1915













HMS Natal
30th December 1915
Under the command of Captain Eric Back, HMS Natal was a Warrior-class armoured cruiser and assigned to 2nd Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet. While lying in the Cromarty Firth the Captain threw a party in the wardroom with civilian guests including children, when an internal ammunition explosion possibly due to faulty cordite ripped through the rear part of the ship. She capsized five minutes later 421 crew and civilian visitors died in the explosion, including women and children.  400 of the crew survived. Captain Eric P. C. Back died in the explosion

ABMIRALTY REPORT:
The fire spread rapidly and a small explosion took place. This was followed immediately afterwards by a series of small explosions and then a final very large and violent explosion, the whole sequence taking only a few seconds. The explosions were followed by a fierce fire with smoke and fumes enveloping the after part of the ship and soon spread forward. The men were ordered to quarters and the forward magazines ordered to be flooded, but this was frustrated by the thick smoke and a power failure. A list to port developed which steadily increased and five minutes after the explosions she capsized and settled with her bilge keel clear of the water. Four hundred and four men died in the explosion and fire. Several causes were suggested, but the most likely was the ignition of old cordite charges, as it was found that she was carrying several lots of cordite with a very questionable history. This had started a fierce fire, which then spread to the after magazines, initially in the 3pdr magazine, then small arms followed by the after 9.2in magazine.


HMS.E6
26th December 1915
Under the command of Lt-Cdr William Foster, HMS.E.6 was one of 57 submarines of the "E" class and assigned to Harwich-based 8th Flotilla: While on anti-U-boat patrol hit a mine and was sunk with the loss of all 32 of the submarines company.


HMS Duchess of Hamilton
29th November 1915
Under the command of  Lt-Cdr Hugh Archer, HMS Duchess of  Hamilton was an ex-Clyde excursion steamer and was converted to an auxiliary paddle minesweeper assigned to the to the flotilla based at Sheerness. While on minesweeping duties with HMS Westward Ho she hit a mine laid by UC.3.Of the ships company 9 were killed in the action. Lt-Cdr Hugh Archer survived.


9th November 1915
Under the command of  Hugh Leopold Phillips, Irene was an Admiralty armed yacht  and was assigned to the Dover Patrol: The Irene was hit by a mine laid by the German submarine UC1 and sank with the loss of all her 21 man crew.



5th November 1915
Under the command of Lt-Cdr Clyfford Warren, HMS E.20 was one of 57 submarines of the "E" class and was under orders to rendezvous with the French submarine Turquoise. However the Turquoise was captured intact with its confidential papers. The Germans now knew of the rendezvous and despatched UB 14 to intercept the unsuspecting E20 On the 5th November from a range of 550 yards UB14 fired a single torpedo scoring a direct hit On E20. 21 of E20s crew were killed in the action, Lt-Cdr Clyfford Warren and nine other survivors were rescued and interned. Lt-Cdr Clyfford Warren survived the Great War.

5th November 1915
hms taraUnder the command of Captain Gwatkin-Williams. HMS Tara was a steam passenger vessel converted to an armed boarding steamer and was assigned to the Mediterranean Station. On the 5th November she was caught in the cross hairs of The German U-boat Commander Arnauld de la Perière on U-35.  HMS Tara was hit by a torpedo and began to sink. 12 members of the ships company were killed in the action. Capt. Gwatkin-Williams and 92 of his crew were taken prisoner and interned and held as prisoners by the Senussi at Bir Hakim, seventy miles from Sollum North Africa.
FOOTNOTE:
the-duke-of-westminster-and-his-armoured-cars-dash-to-the-rescue-of-shipwrecked-crewsThe 2nd Duke of Westminster having been made aware of British prisoners being held in the desert set out on a rescue mission with nine armoured cars, twenty six other cars and ten moror ambulances traversing 115 miles of desert. They reached the camp on the 18 March 1916.  On seeing the cars, the Senussi guards fled, but were pursued and killed, the 91 prisoners who had been treated “Barbarously" by their Turkish and Arab guards were on the point of starvation when rescued, they were brought back to Sollum. Two prisoners, George Cox and John Hodgson, died in early January 1916 due to severe malnutrition. Two more of the Tara’s prisoners died in late January and early February, the first was Robert Williams and then Owen Roberts.
Captain Gwatkin-Williams survived the Great War and went on to become a successful author.


HM T.B. 96
1st November 1915
Under the command of Chief Gunner John D. Sumner, H.M. T.B. 96 was one of ten first-class torpedo boats of the 140 Footer class. And was on a patrol 5 miles East of Gibraltar, when she came in collision with the mercantile SS Tringa and sank rapidly. 2 officers including her commander and 9 ratings were lost.


HMY. ARIES
31st October 1915
Under the command of Lt-Cdr H. R.D. Calder RNR, H.M.Y. Aries was an ocean-going steam yacht converted to an Auxiliary Patrol Yacht and was assigned to the Dover Patrol On the 31st October she struck a mine laid down by the German submarine UC-6, 21 of the yachts company were killed in the explosion including Captain Calder.5 men were rescued

HMY. Hythe
28th October 1915
Under the command of Lt-Cdr Arthur Bird RNR, HMY Hythe was a cross-channel paddle-driven ferry converted into an auxiliary screw minesweeper and was assigned to the Dardanelles Campaign. On the 28th October was under orders to land men of the 1st/3rd Kent Field Company, Royal Engineers near Cape Helles, Dardanelles when she was in collision with armed boarding steamer Sarnia who was steaming away from shore after disembarking her troops.10 men of the ships company were killed in the collision and subsequent sinking. 145 troops were lost.
FOOTNOTE: AN EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT OF THE TRAGEDY:
 The Hythe’s crew had just time to give a warning blast on the siren before the heavier ship hit them forward of the bridge, ploughing into the little vessel’s side, almost cutting her in two. The Hythe’s commander, sensing that the ship was about to go down, called to  Captain Salomons, “Come on, jump. This is your last chance. I am going now." But Salomons stood firm, saying, “No, I will see my men safe first”. He was seen with Company Sergeant Major John Carter, trying to launch a lifeboat. They stood on the bridge, Salomons exhorting his men to keep cool and try to save themselves. They went down with the ship as it slid under the waves.


HMS. Argyll
28th October 1915
HMS ArgyllUnder the command of Captain James Tancred. HMS Argyll was one of six Devonshire-class armoured cruisers and was assigned to the Grand Fleet. On the 28th October she ran aground on the Bell Rock near Dundee during a night storm when the special permission required to have the Bell Rock lighthouse turned on failed to reach the lighthouse keeper. Two destroyers, Hornet and Jackal, were sent and rescued her entire crew without serious injury. Captain James Tancred survived the Great War and was promoted to Vice-Admiral He died on the 9th December, 1943.



HMS. Velox
6th October 1915
HMS Velox TBDUnder the command of Lt Frank Pattinson RNR. HMS. Velox was one of forty destroyers of the "C" class and was assigned to the to the local patrol flotilla at Portsmouth. On the 6th October she hit a mine laid by the German submarine UC-5 off the Nab Lightship Attempts to tow Velox to safety were unsuccessful, and Velox sunk. 4 members of the ships company were killed. Lt Frank Pattinson RNR went on to captain H.M.S. Arab and HM TB. 041. He survived the Great War


HMS. Brighton Queen
6th October 1915
BrightonQueenUnder the command of Lt Eric Rees RNR. HMS. Brighton Queen was an excursion steamer converted into an auxiliary paddle minesweeper and was assigned to the Dover Patrol. On the 6th October she hit a mine laid by the German submarine UC.5 The explosion under her paddle book was sufficient to break the steamer in two and sinking almost immediately. 8 members of the steamers company were killed.


HMY. SANDA
25th September 1915
Under the command of Lt-Cdr Henry Gartside-Tipping RN Rtd. HMY Sanda was an Admiralty yacht and converted into an auxiliary patrol vessel and was assigned to the Dover Patrol. On the 25th September while coming under attack from the shore batteries at Blankenberge she was hit near the deckhouse and sank almost immediately 13 members of the yachts company were killed in the action including her captain.

FOOTNOTE:Lt Cmdr H T Gartside-Tipping returned to naval service during the Great War at the age of 67, he was the oldest serving British naval officer of the Great War. Shortly after her husband’s death Mrs Mary Gartside-Tipping joined the Women's Emergency Corps for service in the in France, where on the 4th March 1917 she was shot by a soldier whose mind was “disordered”. The French military authorities did everything possible to express their sympathy; the Croix de Guerre which had been withheld from women since November 1916 was conferred at once; and a full military funeral accorded.


HMS. E7
4th September 1915
e7 1COLTRANUnder the command of Lt Cmdr. Cochrane. HMS E7 was one of 57 of the "E" class submarines and was assigned to the Dardanelles Campaign. On 4th September the E7 starboard propeller became entangled in anti-submarine nets at Nagara. When hand-dropped mines exploded near to E7's hull Lt Cmdr. Cochrane (having destroyed the confidential papers and set explosive charges to scuttle the boat) was forced to surface to avoid being depth charged to destruction. All of the crew survived and were made Prisoners of War by the Turks and were imprisoned in local jails until the end of the war. Soon after the crew had been taken, E7's charge exploded and she sank to the bottom.

FOOTNOTE:Lt Cmdr. Cochrane made two attempts to escape. He was recaptured after the first try but on the second attempt, he managed to steal a boat and sail to Cyprus. He survived the Great War becoming a Member of Parliament (MP) in 1924 and the Governor of Burma in 1936. Captain Sir Archibald Douglas Cochrane, GCMG, KCSI, DSO died on the 16th April 1958.

 
HMS. C29
29th August 1915
Under the command of Lt William Schofield. HMS. C.29 was one of 38 C. Class submarines and was assigned to the 7th Flotilla Rosyth based. Its duties were to be towed by a Trawler which was acting as bait for German raiders, on the 29th of August while on anti-U-boat patrol with the trawler Ariadne, C29 was submerged and in telephone contact with the Ariadne when an underwater explosion occurred, the assumption being that C29 had hit a mine with the loss of all hands.  2 officers and 15 ratings.



18th August 1915
E13 rvbe13Under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Geoffrey Layton. HMS.E13 was one of 57 E Class submarines and was assigned to the Eighth Submarine Flotilla. Ordered with E.8 to join E.1 and E.9 to the Baltic to intercept German shipping, particularly vessels carrying iron ore shipments from Sweden in order to maintain the British naval blockade of Germany. On the 18 August, the submarine ran aground in neutral waters near Saltholm Island between Malmö and Copenhagen. On the 19 the Danish torpedo boat Narhvalen arrived to inform the captain that there was a 24 hour limit for getting off, no assistance could be given and a guard ship would anchor nearby. When the German destroyer G.132 came up but left when two more Danish TB's arrived, by this time it was accepted that E.13 could not be refloated and the crew were waiting to be taken off. About 0900 (or 0930) two German destroyers approached from the south flying the signal "abandon ship immediately", the leading destroyer G.132 fired one or two torpedoes which hit the bottom but failed to damage E.13, then both opened fire with machine guns, the crew jumped into the water and swam for the shore or the Danish vessels but the Germans opened fire on them until the torpedo boat Soulven positioned herself between the German vessels and survivors in the water. The German destroyers left and the surviving men picked up by the Danes. 15 members of E13's company were killed in the attack. 15 survivors including the submarines captain Lt-Cdr Layton landed in Copenhagen that evening and were interned.


FOOTNOTE: Lieutenant Lt Cdr Geoffrey Layton and Lt Paul Leathley Eddis, leaving dummies in their beds absconded from their internment camp. Dressed as American tourists they boarded the SS Venus a Norwegian ferry bound for Newcastle. Lt Cdr Geoffrey Layton survived the Great War and advanced to the rank of Admiral he died 4th September 1964. Lt Cdr Eddis survived the Great War but would be killed on the 10th January 1924 when his submarine HMS L24 was sunk with the loss of all hands after a collision with the battleship HMS. Resolution.




9th August 1915
hms lynxUnder the command of Cdr John Cole. HMS. Lynx was an Acasta-class destroyer and was assigned to the Fourth Destroyer Flotilla. Its duties were to intercept board and search neutral vessels in order to maintain the British naval blockade of Germany. On the 9th August while on patrol with two other destroyers in Moray Firth she struck a mine which had been laid by the German ship Meteor and sank almost instantly. 70 members of the ships company were killed in the action including her captain Cdr Cole. Four officers and twenty-two ratings survived picked up by SS Vocana later that morning.


8th August 1915
TheRamsey-Under the command of Cdr Harry Raby RNR. HMS Ramsey was an Admiralty armed boarding steamer and was assigned to the Grand Fleet. Its duties were to intercept board and search neutral vessels in order to maintain the British naval blockade of Germany. On the 8th August she intercepted a steamship flying the Russian flag (Meteor), The Ramsey signalled the stranger to stop, and closed to about 80yds to lower a boat, when the German ensign was hoisted by the Meteor and attacked with gunfire and torpedoes at point blank range. The Ramsey badly damaged sank in three minutes. 53 members of the ships company were killed in the action including her captain Cdr Harry Raby. 46 survivors were picked up by the Meteor and held as POWs until the next day when Meteor was herself intercepted by superior British forces having transferred her prisoners to neutral ships was then scuttled. The surviving members of Ramsey's crew returned home in HMS Undaunted.



8th August 1915
hms indiaUnder the command of Cdr William Kennedy: HMS. India was a passenger ship converted into an armed merchant cruiser and was assigned to the 10th Cruiser Squadron Northern Patrol; Its duties were to intercept board and search neutral vessels in order to maintain the British naval blockade of Germany. Whilst carrying out these duties she was hit by a torpedo fired by the German Submarine U22 and started to sink. 9 officers and 107 of the ships company were killed in the action, Cdr William Kennedy and 188 of his men survived the sinking by being rescued by Swedish SS Gotaland and HM Trawler Saxon, and landed in Norway where they were interned.



6th August 1915
Under the command of Walter Richmond RNR. HMT Leandros was an Admiralty trawler converted into a minesweeper and was assigned to the Dover Patrol. On the 6th August she hit a mine laid by the German submarine UC5 near the North Knock Sand Buoy, off Thames Estuary and sank with the loss of 7 ratings.

HMS. Clementina
4th August 1915
Under the command of Capt. Thomas Walker (retired Vice Admiral) was a hired Admiralty yacht and used as an auxiliary patrol vessel. On the 4 of August was involved in a collision with the SS Adam Smith In order prevent her from sinking was run aground and beached nearby. No lives were lost at this time, but Walter B Dines an Assistant Engineer RNR died on 20 September 1915 from injuries sustained.in the collision. Capt. Thomas Walker survived the war and died 27 August, 1932.

4th August 1915
Under the command of Lieutenant Gerald Ernest Berkeley Carter was one of 38 submarines of the "C" class.  C33 was involved in the U-Boat trap tactic. The tactic was to use a decoy trawler to tow a submarine. When a U-boat was sighted, the tow line and communication line was slipped and the submarine would attack the U-boat. She was mined off Great Yarmouth while operating with the armed trawler Malta: With the loss of all hands.


20th July 1915
Under the command of Lt-Cdr George Wellburn RNR. HMY. RHIANNON was a hired Admiralty yacht and used as an auxiliary patrol vessel. On the 20th July 1915 was ordered to investigate sightings of mines near the wreck of the Norwegian steamer Peik, when she herself detonated a mine which had been laid by the German submarine UC3 in the Thames Estuary. HMY. RHIANNON sank with the loss of 5 of the ships company including her captain Lt-Cdr Wellburn.

30th June 1915

hms lightningUnder the command of Lt James Cavendish RN, HMS Lightning was an A-class destroyer and was assigned to the Nore Local Defence Flotilla. On the 30 June she was on patrol off the Thames estuary with HMS Vulture, searching for Floating mines when HMS Lightning hit a mine laid by the German submarine UC.1 earlier that morning. 15 ratings were killed in the action Lt James Cavendish survived and would captain H.M.S. Midge at the Battle of Jutland he survived the Great War.


10th June 1915
Under the command of Lt-Cdr John McLeod RN, HMTB. 10 was a Cricket class torpedo boat and was assigned to the Nore Local Defence Flotilla. On the 10 June she was on patrol off the Thames estuary, searching for reported submarines when having witnessed HMTB 12 hit a mine she immediately went to her aid whilst trying to take HMTB 12 in tow she to hit a mine and broke in half. With the loss of 22 crew members. Lt-Cdr John McLeod survived the Great War but died on 23rd September 1920.


10th June 1915
Under the command of Lt Edward Bulteel, HMTB. 12 was a Cricket class torpedo boat and was assigned to the Nore Local Defence Flotilla. on the 10 June she was on patrol off the Thames estuary, searching for reported submarines when she hit a mine and managed to stayed afloat long enough for  TB.10 to came alongside and take  her in tow. Lt Bulteel and 22 members of his crew were killed.



27th May 1915
Princess Irene memoriamUnder the command of Captain Mervyn Cobbe R.N, HMS Princess Irene was a GRT ocean liner converted to an auxiliary minelayer and was moored in the River Medway. Her crew and naval personnel were preparing the ship to lay mines in the North Sea. Additionally on board civilian workers from Sheerness Dockyard who were carrying out repairs and modifications to the ship. Mines were also being loaded from barges and stowed on the ship's two mine decks. At about 11.15 hours there was an explosion and the Princess Irene disintegrated. A small steam ship and two barges lying alongside were also destroyed . A total of 352 people were killed, including 273 officers and men, and 76 dockyard workers.

The following telegram was sent to Admiralty informing them of the loss.

FROM RearAdmiral & Superintendant, Sheerness.
To  Commander-in-Chief, The Nore. 
Confidential. 
“Princess Irene” blew up about 11.15 this morning, lying at No.28 buoy.  Of the vessel nothing remains visible. “Angora” lying at No.27 buoy suffered minor damage to cabins, glass etc. by force of explosion. Oil Fuel Depot, Port Victoria, has been severely damaged by portions of vessel being blown through Tanks & Pumping Station. Four Full Tanks perforated and oil escaping to about half way down. Pumping Station and main pump line damaged and out of action, caused by large fragments of ship’s side falling on them. Oiling Pier also damaged. As far as can be ascertained only one Survivor – Stoker David Wills picked up alive but burnt. Several men belonging to vessels lying close to were wounded by falling splinters

27th May 1915
hms majestic aUnder the command of Captain Henry FitzRoy George Talbot, HMS Majestic was a Majestic-class pre-dreadnought battleship and was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron in February 1915. HMS Majestic was anchored inshore amongst transports and escorts. Despite her anti-torpedo nets being out, the torpedo fired by the German Submarine U.21 passed straight through the heavy anti-torpedo meshes and hit her amidships and was quickly followed by another, within seven minutes the ship had capsized. Forty of HMS Majestic ratings were killed in the initial explosions. Captain Henry FitzRoy George Talbot survived the Great War but died suddenly at sea on 3rd July whilst in command of the light cruiser Caledon.

25 May 1915

hms Triumph1PSUnder the command of Captain Maurice Swynfen Fitzmaurice, HMS Triumph was the second of two Swiftsure-class pre-dreadnought battleships and was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron in January 1915. HMS Triumph was torpedoed through her deployed anti-torpedo netting by the German submarine SM U-21 who managed to shoot her torpedos moments before being spoted and coming under fire from the crew of HMS Triumph.  The resulting explosion severely crippled the ship which began to sink slowly, Three officers and 75 members of the ships company died.  Captain Fitzmaurice survived the sinking having been thrown into the water He was picked up by a destroyer after several minutes in the water, apparently with his monocle still firmly in place. Sir Maurice Fitzmaurice reached the rank of vice-admiral in 1926 and died on 23 January 1927 aged 56.


13th May 1915

hms goiath ahms goliathUnder the command of Captain Thomas Lawrie Shelford, HMS Goliath, was one of six Canopus-class pre-dreadnought battleships and was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron on the 25 March 1915 to participate in the Gallipoli campaign. On the night of 12–13 May, while at station and being screened by five destroyers the Turkish torpedo boat Muavenet manned by a combined German and Turkish crew managed to evade  the screen and fire two torpedoes which struck Goliath causing a massive explosion. Goliath began to capsize almost immediately. 570 of the ships company lost their lives including her Captain Thomas Shelford, with only 130 of her crew surviving the sinking.







HMS. Maori
7th May 1915

Under the command of Commander Benjamin W. Barrow, H.M.S. Maori, was one of twelve destroyers of the "Tribal" class and was assigned to
HMS MAORI-3-1909-1915

Sixth Destroyer Flotilla based at Dover, On the 7 May was under orders with HMS Crusader to carry out a reconnaissance of the German positions off Ostende. H.M.S. Maori struck a mine and began to sink; A boat was sent from HMS Crusader to rescue the crew of the Maori but was unable to remain at station to retrieve the survivors due to accurate bombardment from shore batteries. all 95 of MAORI’s crew plus the 4 men from Crusaders’ boat became POWs of the Germans. Commander Benjamin W. Barrow survived the Great War.  

HMS. Recruit
1st May 1915

hms recruitUnder the command of Commander Charles A. W. Wrightson, HMS Recruit, was a Clydebank three funnel "C" class destroyer and was assigned to Nore Local Defence Flotilla, Her duties included anti-submarine and counter mining patrols in the Thames Estuary. On 1 May 1915, she was torpedoed by the German submarine UB-6, off the Galloper Light Vessel in the southern North Sea. The explosion cut the vessel in two and the two halves quickly sank. 34 members of the ships company were killed.  4 officers and 22 men were rescued including Commander Wrightson who survived the Great War and died after a short illness on 7th February 1953.



HMAS. AE2
30 April 1915

AE2 stokerUnder the command of Lieutenant-Commander Henry H. G. D. Stoker, HMAS AE2, was one of 57 submarines of the "E" class and was assigned to the British 2nd Submarine Flotilla, British Dardanelles Squadron. In April 1915 the Australian submarine AE2 passed undetected through the perilous mine fields of the Dardanelles and into the Sea of Marmara where it was able to threaten Turkish shipping and prevent reinforcements reaching Gallipoli. On 30 April, while

hms ae22attempting to rendezvous with  E14, AE2 was confronted with the Ottoman torpedo boat Sultanhisar. As AE2 attempted to dive, it encountered mechanical problems and was forced to the surface where it was attacked and fatally damaged. All on board were forced to abandon the submarine and were taken captive. Stoker and his crew ensured, however, that AE2 sank to the bottom of the sea so that the Ottoman forces would not be able to take possession of it. Lieutenant-Commander Stoker and his crew would spend the next three-and-a-half years in a Turkish prison camp. Four ratings died in captivity the remainder were released following the Armistice in 1918.



HMS. (SS) River Clyde
25th April 1915

hms clydeEdward Unwin VCUnder the command of Commander Edward Unwin, HMS (SS) River Clyde, was a GRT British collier and requisitioned by the Royal Navy in 1915 and was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron and participated in the Gallipoli landings at the Seddul Bahr end of V-beach (the other end was Cape Helles) under "murderous fire" only 200 troops disembarked in the first three hours as the hopper grounded too far from the shore for the gangway to reach this was only made possible by Cdr Unwin and members of the crew who in full view of the Turks, secured and held the lighters and hopper as the troops passed over. Cdr Unwin stood in the water holding lines and although wounded, later rescued other wounded from the shore by boat, Midshipman Drewry in command of the hopper was also wounded but carried on until Midshipman Malleson took over, AB William stayed in the water holding the pontoon fast until he was killed and Seaman Samson worked on the lighters all day before being badly wounded. The main body of troops only landed that night. Mid George Leslie Drewry RNR (from Hussar), Mid Wilfred St Aubyn Malleson (battleship Cornwallis), Seaman George McKenzie Samson RNR (Hussar), Cdr Edward Unwin (Hussar), AB William Charles William RFR (Hussar) posthumously, were all awarded the Victoria Cross.


HMS. E15
17th April 1915

Under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Theodore S. Brodie, HMS E15 was one of 57 submarines of the "E" class and was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron. On the 17th April, while submerged she ran aground  near Kepez Point directly under the guns of Fort Dardanus, Chlorine gas began escaping from the subs damaged batteries which forced the crew to evacuate the sub and surrender to the Turkish army. Lieutenant-Commander Theodore S. Brodie and six other crew members were killed in the action a further six more members of HMS E15 crew would die while being incarcerated in a Turkish prisoner war camp near Istanbul.

FOOTNOTE:A number of attempts to destroy E15 by the British had failed, until two picket boats one from HMS Triumph and another from HMS Majestic crewed entirely by volunteers managed to sink E15 with a torpedo. One crew man was killed when Majestic picket boat was hit by shell fire, her crew being rescued and returned to safety by Lieutenant Commander Eric Robinson in command of HMS Triumphs picket boat.



HMS TB.064
21st March 1915

Under the command of Gunner James Cottrell, Torpedo boat 064, a Mediterranean-based patrol boat which was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron. On the 17th April, Ran aground and wrecked East side of Lemnos island; no lives lost.


HMS. Ocean
18th March 1915
hms oceanUnder the command of Captain Arthur Hayes-Sadler, H.M.S. Ocean was a Canopus-class battleship and was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron in late February 1915. On 18 March 1915, HMS Ocean took part in the attack on the Narrows forts of Çanakkale and Kilitbahirwas. When the battleship HMS Irresistible was disabled by a mine Ocean was sent in to tow her to safety  but ran aground during the attempt, having freed herself and with the remaining crew members from HMS Irresistible on board  Ocean herself struck a drifting mine and was abandoned  with one fatal casualty  Albert HARRIS Stoker 1st Class . Captain Arthur Hayes-Sadler survived the Great War and went on to achieve the rank of Admiral he died on the 9th February, 1952.


HMS. Irresistible
18th March 1915

hms irresitable Under the command of Captain Douglas L. Dent, HMS Irresistible was a Formidable-class pre-dreadnought battleship and was assigned to the British Dardanelles Squadron in February 1915. She was badly damaged when she struck a mine while participating in the bombardment of the Narrows forts of Çanakkale and Kilitbahirwas. The starboard engine room flooded, killing all but three of the men on duty. Without power and listing she drifted into the range of the Turkish forts guns   which opened fire on her. All the surviving crew, except for the captain and a few volunteers were transferred to the destroyer HMS Wear. Attempts to Tow HMS Irresistible by HMS Ocean were abandoned but Ocean did manage to rescue the remaining crew members. HMS Irresistible was eventually sunk by the Turkish shore batteries. Eleven men died when she sank, with two more to succumb later. Captain Douglas L. Dent survived the sinking and went on to reach the rank of Admiral. He died on the 11th July, 1959.


HMS.Bayano
11th March 1915

bayonoUnder the command of Commander H.C. Carr, HMS Erne was a converted Armed Merchant Cruiser. She was on route from Glasgow to Liverpool on the 11th March 1915 when she was torpedoed off Corsewall Point, Galloway, Scotland by U-27. 
She sank rapidly with only four officers and 22 ratings Surviving.Fourteen officers, including Commander Carr and 181 ratings were killed


 An account published in 1918 gave further details: 'Twenty four half-dead men, some on a couple of rafts, others on a ship's boat floating wrong side up. One or two, the strongest or the most determined, were trying to attract attention by flag-wagging with shirts tied to oars. So far their ebbing energy had been altogether wasted, though the exercise served to keep them warmer than their mates. Not much of the romance of the sea here; rather all tragedy, and cold, and hunger, and the bitterness that enters into a man's soul at such times. Bruises and blood were common to most of the poor fellows. They had been badly buffeted. Three and a half hours in the water, ill-clad, exposed to the searching wind, helpless and well-nigh hopeless and to the north a large liner pursuing her course without regard for their sufferings. If those on the look-out on the passing vessel saw the flotsam at all, which is scarcely likely, they probably regarded rafts and boat as a cluster of seaweed. The next ship that came their way mistook the little group for a submarine. At a distance the floating things merged into one. No blame to the captain had he given the black mass a wide berth; ships had been lost in the Irish Sea before through inquisitiveness. He approached a little closer, without becoming too venturesome. If the object on which his glasses were focussed were a U-boat, it was without a conning tower. Presently the captain picked out figures, an upturned boat and rafts. It is not easy to effect a rescue in a small boat, particularly when those needing succour are almost past help. Eighteen men were lifted or helped in, and transferred to the steamer, a coaler named the Balmerino, commanded by Captain James Foster. Before the boat returned for the others an armed merchantman had come up and taken them off. They were survivors of the Bayano, a vessel of the Merchant Service engaged on patrol duty. She was 'carrying on ' when a torpedo hit at five o'clock in the morning, when many of her 220 men were below. The nature of the explosion was such that few of them were afforded an opportunity to get away from the stricken steamer. She heaved for a few minutes only after having received the wound, and disappeared with the majority of her company. Dead bodies floating in lifebelts, and a quantity of wreckage were discovered by the SS Castlereagh, which was obliged to give up searching the spot for possible survivors owing to the appearance of a German submarine. The enemy saw to it that this humanitarian task was not accomplished by chasing the steamer for twenty minutes. The Bayano was submarined, and took some 200 men to the bottom with her in four minutes'.


HMS. Erne
6th February 1915
 
hms erne
Under the command of Lieutenant-Commander John Landon, HMS Erne was a Palmer Type River Class Destroyer and was assigned to the 9th Destroyer Flotilla based at Chatham. During a severe easterly gale she was driven ashore on the Scottish North Sea Coast at 800 yards South of Rattray Head lighthouse north east of Aberdeenshire with no lives lost. After failing to refloat her she was abandoned as a wreck

HMS. Clan MacNaughton
3rd February 1915

Under the command of Commander Robert Jeffreys RN, H.M.S. Clan MacNaughton was a converted armed merchant cruiser and was assigned to the 10th Cruiser squadron. Clan MacNaughton sank off the north coast of Ireland and is believed to have been destroyed by an enemy mine. Although it was believed at the time that alterations made to her upper structure may have made her un-seaworthy and questions were asked in the House of Commons. Dr Thomas James Macnamarathe Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty responded The "Clan MacNaughton," a nearly new vessel of the Clan Line, classed by the British Corporation Registry, was fitted out for His Majesty's service at Tilbury under the supervision of naval, constructive, and engineering officers deputed to act for that purpose. The armament placed in the vessel was light in comparison with her size, and all necessary stiffening to take it was fitted. Investigations as to the loading and the stability of the vessel were made at the Admiralty, and instructions were issued to the commanding officer of the ship. The Admiralty are satisfied that the vessel was in good condition and seaworthy, and that she possessed ample stability.”.. All hands were lost...  278 officers and men

HMS. E 10
18th January, 1915

Under the command of Lieutenant-Commander William St. J. Fraser, H.M.S. E 10 was one of 57 submarines of the "E" class. HMS E10 sailed from Harwich for operations NNW of Heligoland. No further contact was made with the submarine after parting company with HMS E5 on the evening of the 18th. It is believed that E10 was destroyed by an enemy mine. All hands were lost...  31 officers and men...

HMS. Viknor
13th January 1915

hms vecknorUnder the command of Commander. Ernest Ballantyne, H.M.S. Viknor was an armed merchant cruiser and was assigned to the 10th Cruiser squadron to patrol between Scotland and Iceland. Viknor Sunk after either hitting a mine or encountering bad weather or a combination of both. All hands were lost...  22 officers and 273 ratings.


HMS. C31
4th January 1915
hms C 31Under the command of Lt. George Pilkington. HMS C31 was a C-class submarine and was assigned to the Fourth Submarine Flotilla. Sunk after either hitting a mine or destroyed by land batteries off Zeebrugge, with the loss of all hands including Lt. George Pilkington.


1st January 1915

capt loxley
HMSFormidable
       Under the command of Captain Arthur N. Loxley., H.M.S. Formidable was the lead ship of the Formidable Class of battleship and was assigned to the 5th Battle Squadron which was stationed at Nore. While on Channel patrol off Portland Bill  H.M.S. Formidable was struck by a torpedo fired from U 24 which hit her on the starboard side and almost immediately began to list, 45 minutes later she was struck by a second torpedo. In the Darkness and worsening weather conditions with swells of 30 ft. (9.1 m) it made it difficult to get men and boats over the side, just the pinnaces and other lifeboats (one of which capsized soon after) were launched.  Two of the squadrons light cruisers came alongside Formidable and managed to pick up 80 men. Of HMS Formidable compliment, 547 officers and men died, including the ship's captain, Arthur N. Loxley, with only 233 survivors. HMS Formidable was the third British battleship to be sunk and the second to be sunk by enemy action, during the The Great War.