6th June 1915
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6th June 1915

Second Lieutenant George Raymond Dallas Moor
 
The youngest recipient of the Victoria Cross deed of valour occurred today. George Raymond Dallas Moor was just an 18 year old 2nd Lieutenant serving with the 2nd Battalion the Hampshire Regiment at Gallipoli. On the morning of the 6th June 1915 on what would become the third and final day of the third Battle of Krithia, a fierce counter attack by Turkish troops had ruptured part of the allied line. A detachment of the Australian Infantry which had lost all its officers abandoned its position and was “rapidly retiring”. Realizing the danger that such a breach posed to the rest of the line, Second Lieutenant George Raymond Dallas Moor runs back some 200 yards and confronts the fleeing men, restores order and leads the men back to the line and recaptures the lost trench. His citation reads

 “For most conspicuous bravery and resource on the 5th June, 1915, during operations South of Krithia, Dardanelles. When a detachment of a battalion on his left, which had lost all its officers, was rapidly retiring before a heavy Turkish attack, 2nd Lieutenant Moor immediately grasping the danger to the remainder of the line, dashed back some two hundred yards, stemmed the retirement, led back the men, and recaptured the lost trench. This young officer who only joined the Army in October, 1914, by his personal bravery and presence of mind saved a dangerous situation”

An eyewitness account of the incident reads:

 "There was an anxious moment during a vigorous counter-attack by the Turks, when it looked as if they had broken through at a particularvulnerable point on our right at the junction of two battalions each commanded by a second lieutenant. One of these officers, 2nd Lieutenant R. G. Moor of the 2nd Hants, and then in command of his battalion, seeing the disorderly retirement in the sector of the battalion on his left, which amounted to panic for want of officers to control them, and realizing the dangers of his own battalion, with great presence of mind, and regardless of the danger, rushed across the open, exposed to fire for 400 yards, and succeeded in heading the mob. He had to use severe measures to bring them to their senses, even shooting the leaders of the panic. He then collected the troops in a hollow, organized them, and led them to the counter-attack. He regained the lost trenches, driving out the Turks, organized the defences, and when reporting by telephone what had occurred he utterly collapsed from the strain. This was not surprising, when it is realized he had only left Cheltenham College the previous September."


There is no definitive proof or historical evidence in the allegation that 2nd Lieutenant Moor shoots or killed any of the fleeing men, but the controversy over the incident still rages today and of course 2nd Lieutenant Moor is no longer here to defend himself. However there is evidence to attest to his bravery. Promoted to Lieutenant, Moore received two further citations:

Military Cross citation: (gazetted 2 December 1918) "Lieutenant George Raymond Dallas Moor, V.C., Hampshire Regiment. For conspicuous gallantry and skill. He carried out a daylight reconnaissance all along the divisional front in face of heavy machine-gun fire at close range, in many places well in front of our foremost posts."

Bar to Military Cross (gazetted 29 July 1919) "On October 20th, 1918, near to Pijpestraat, the vanguard commander was wounded and unable to carry on. Owing to heavy shelling and machine-gun fire, the vanguard came to a standstill. Lieut. Moor, Acting General Staff Officer, who was reconnoitring the front, noticed this; he immediately took charge, and by his fearless example and skilful leading continued the advance until the objective was reached. He has a positive contempt for danger, and distinguishes himself on every occasion."

George Raymond Dallas Moor VC, MC, & Bar, died of Spanish Influenza at Mouvaux, France, on 3rd November 1918. He is buried in the Y Farm Military Cemetery, Bois-Grenier







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