8th June 1915
Gallery Solace - The Great War 1914-1918
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THE GREAT WAR BLOG

8th June 1915



King Constantine I suffering from pneumonia and pleurisy was said to be close to death and received the last rites when the holy ikon of the Virgin and Child from the shrine of Panayia Evanghelistria was brought to his bedside from Tinos in the Cyclades. Miraculously, he recovered, and his wife, Queen Sophie, presented a large sapphire to enrich the ikon.

Major William Henry Johnston VC was killed by a sniper on 8th June 1915 near Zwarteleen in the Ypres Salient, just four days after being appointed Brigade Major of 15 Brigade. He had seen action at the retreat from Mons and the battles of Aisne, the Marne, Neuve Chapelle and the first and second battles of Ypres. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for is actions on September 14th 1914.


In todays' Daily Telegraph with what were becoming regular Zeppelin raids causing death and damage (another one reported today on the East Coast leaves 2 dead and 40 injured) anything that put the boot on the other foot was bound to be applauded, and so news of the shooting down of one of the airships, and a raid on a shed, was the big news of the day on page 9. This was considered by the Telegraph to be “the most successful and brilliant exploit yet carried out by the British Naval Flying Corps during the war,” which by now had plenty of competition; just how many times have there been “brilliant” exploits reported so far, or great acts of daring and gallantry. Perhaps it is too much to expect the authorities to use a thesaurus to mix the reports up, but the overuse of some words does run the grave danger of them becoming hackneyed, if they aren’t actually already.Another recruiting effort is launched in London – page 3, with an accompanying picture - The Suffragettes now look to assist needy East Londoners have time in the country to help their health – page 4 - Another example of what looks like a report but turns out to be otherwise on page 4, where the advantages of employing Boy Scouts in the office are extolled - The British Fire Prevention Committee gives advice as to measures to be taken against incendiary bombs – page 7 - The Russians report that the Germans appear to be viewing their use of poison gas as some form of divine dispensation – page 9 - The Bill for the creation of the Ministry of Munitions is put to the Commons, but the suggestion there is no need to debate it does not got down well, whilst the Government has to allay fears it will be a back-door means of introducing “compulsion” – page 9.







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