19th October 1915
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19th October 1915




Leonard James Keyworth VC was killed in action on this day in Abbeville, France.  As a 21-year-old Keyworth performed an act of bravery for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross. His Citation reads:









For most conspicuous bravery at Givenchy on the night of 25-26th May, 1915. After the assault on the German position by the 24th Battalion, London Regt, efforts were made by that Unit to follow up their success by a bomb attack, during the progress of which 58 men out of a total 75 became casualties. During this very fierce encounter Lance-Cpl Keyworth stood fully exposed for 2 hours on the top of the enemy's parapet, and threw about 150 bombs amongst the Germans, who were only a few yards away.




In todays' Daily Telegraph: Perhaps it was because it was a relatively fresh development, but the renewed fighting engendered by the invasion of Serbia was clearly the significant news today, given the multifacted coverage on page 4 (with another map which displays the area but gives little clue as to where the fighting might be, despite its title of “Allied Campaign in the Balkans”), page 8, page 9, page 10 and page 11. Even so, the banner headline on page 9 concentrated on the resignation, for reasons yet to be discovered, of Sir Edward Carson from the Cabinet, a situation given added dimension by Irish Nationalist John Redmond’s speech (page 10) alluding to the internal and external dangers threatening this body.
It wasn’t just in the Cabinet that change was afoot, as the Dardanelles campaign had a new commander, with General Sir C. C. Monro replacing General Sir Ian Hamilton, who is according to the official statement “returning to England to make a report,” which surely even at the time must have seemed a slightly odd way of bowing out. Given that E. Ashmead-Bartlett’s latest Dardanelles despatch on pages 9 and 10 concentrates on the work to date of the destroyers there is more than a hint that land operations are not going to plan there.
Also in today’s paper
- Sir Robert Baden-Powell devises a scheme that every Scout gives the proceeds of one day’s work towards a fund for a new ambulance with any over given towards a recreation hut – page 3
- A woman is remanded after poisoning her husband’s tea – page 4. Her defence was the laziness of her husband drove her to it - Forty-six Chinamen are sent to prison for three months after absenting themselves from a steamer – page 5 - Another case of an article reading as much as an advert on page 5 on the food value of the Royal Whitstable oyster - A “sensational” fight in the air between British and German seaplanes is documented by a territorial officer on page 7 - A “splendid response” is reported to the plans for the upcoming charitable “Our Day” (see October 12) – page 11 - Sir Claude Phillips reports on the measures, “truly remarkable in their complexity and completeness,” taken for the protection of the “incomparable monuments and art treasures” of Venice, and going back to the tenor of his recent articles, compares them favourably with what is happening in London – page 12

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