23rd October 1915
Gallery Solace - The Great War 1914-1918
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A DAY BY DAY ACCOUNT OF HOW THE GREAT WAR WAS PERTRAYED ON THE FRONT PAGE OF THE BRITISH PRESS
A DAY BY DAY ACCOUNT OF HOW THE GREAT WAR WAS PORTRAYED ON THE FRONT PAGE OF THE
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23rd October 1915


In todays' Daily Telegraph
You could call today appeal day in the paper. The central place on the main news page (page 9) is given over to “a lofty appeal to the patriotism of the people” by King George V, with a facsimile image of the “ringing summons to duty which cannot and will not be ignored by the King’s loyal subjects” which receives a ringing endorsement form a leader on page 8.
Then on page 9 comes the launch of the Telegraph’s shilling fund for 1915, although the previous year’s Belgian one has not been closed. This is in response to a letter from one Norman Forbes Robertson, who was so incensed by the execution of Edith Cavell, “ruthlessly butchered by the Huns” as he puts it, that he proposes a Telegraph appeal fund for a monument to the nurse, already has a Royal Academician lined up to make a sculpture for it, and launches the fund with 100 shillings (£5). The Telegraph’s proprietors were more than happy to accede to this request, and added £1,000 shillings (£50) of their own to get the ball rolling. The outcome of this appeal can still be seen in St Martin’s Place, London.
Meanwhile the National Egg Collection for wounded soldiers and sailors appeals for help on page 7, in an article with the mind-boggling figures that it has collected 11 million eggs for the cause so far, but claims it needs another 100,000 eggs a day for its work, whilst on page 12 the National Political Land League Council appeals for more women workers on the land.
Also in today’s paper
- A Commercial Correspondent writes on what is “by no means the least thrilling chapter to be written” of the war – Germany’s shady commercial machinations (page 6)
- The Allies start bombarding Bulgarian ports – page 9 - The latest news from Serbia gives “a decidedly grave impression of the position of the Serbian army” – page 9
- An account of the final interview with Edith Cavell, from the British Chaplain at Brussels on the night before her execution, is reprinted on pages 9 and 10 - Looks like bad news for the Austrians on page 10, with the Russians announcing a victory in Galicia and the Italians a “vigorous offensive on a wide front” - A reader registers his outrage on page 10 at a naturalised German being able to run a garage, and argues given his experiences of motoring past an ammunition works without being challenged, that no enemy alien should be permitted to own a motor car for the duration of the war
- French commander General Joffre tells an American reporter “Peace to-day would be a crime against posterity” – page 11 - A nephew of the Bulgarian Tsar Ferdinand is reported to have been blinded by an acid attack by his mistress – page 11. The report ignores the fact he’s a third cousin to George V - Henry Ford gives $10,000 to the Canadian Red Cross and declares his sympathies are pro-Ally to mollify his Canadian workers after upsetting them with a speech against the British war loan – page 11
- The women’s page (page 12) looks at how women are assisting the war effort, as well as jobs their sisters across the Atlantic do, including washing paper money; a good day’s washing consists of dealing with 35,000 bills apparently


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