25th October 1915
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25th October 1915


In todays' Daily Telegraph; Whilst the fighting in Serbia appeared to be going badly for that nation and her Allies (page 9) the execution of Edith Cavell was still dominating news closer to home. Whilst Home Secretary Sir John Simon was unfavourably contrasting her treatment to that meted out by the Allies to an American journalist in an article calling the execution “The Great Crime” the Telegraph’s shilling fund for a memorial to the “martyr nurse” had over the weekend already raised over 5,000 shillings (£250), and various luminaries were giving their support (pages 9 and 10), as was a French newspaper which called her “the Joan of Arc of England.” The Americans were also in sympathy as evinced by a leader from the New York Times reprinted on page 10.
And there was another death to report about at home as well, although in this case not due to the war. W. G. Grace, “the finest all-round cricketer who ever donned flannels” as a leader on Grace on page 8 calls him, goes to the great cricket ground in the sky, and page 7 pays due tribute to him.
Also in today’s paper
- A rather horrendous roll of honour today, covering part of page 2 and most of page 3 for the NCOs and men and a good portion of page 5 for the officers.
- Lord Derby expresses confidence that his new measures for recruiting will save the voluntary system, and the trade union leaders out campaigning for recruits have a similar message – page 7. Meanwhile the King’s appeal for men to join up is reprinted on page 8 - Philip Gibbs tries to alleviate “a sense of perplexity in the minds of people at home as to the exact meaning of what is happening, or what is failing to happen” at Loos in a despatch on page 10 - Amazingly nothing whatsoever on the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt. You’d have thought in wartime one of England’s greatest victories would be celebrated, even if the defeated party was now an ally

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