30th October 1915
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30th October 1915


In todays' Daily Telegraph; Readers today woke to the shocking news that King George V had had an accident whilst visiting the troops in France. A brief medical report announced that he was severely bruised after he fell from his horse when, excited by the cheers of the troops, it had reared up. Fortunately for the paper Philip Gibbs was on hand to provide more details (page 9) of an incident which a leader on page 8 confidently proclaimed would only intensify the “devotion both of his Army in the field and of his subjects at home.”
How important this news was can be shown by the way it displaces Edith Cavell’s memorial service from the main headline, which nevertheless gets the full reporting works from Hall Caine on pages 9 and 10, alongside several other articles concerning her execution (or murder, as the paper prefers to regard it)
Also in today’s paper
- In the law court reports today, an “interesting judgment” over an appeal in a case concerning a man sued for breaking off an engagement on the grounds his fiancée was unfit to be married, and “a matter of considerable importance to builders” with man suing the building firm he used to work for before he was paralysed after falling from a walkway consisting of two planks – page 4. Meanwhile a headmaster wins an appeal against being fined for assaulting a pupil by caning him in what a doctor described as a “good thrashing” as the Recorder comes down on his side, accusing those who express the idea that no boy should be beaten as having flabby sentimentality on page 11
- Cheltenham reports an increased visitor trade thanks to the war – page 7 - The usual war of words over what is happening spreads to the Serbian arena, with the Germans and French making claim and counter-claim over the progress of the fighting there – page 8 - An article is pleased to proclaim on page 9 that “several brilliant editorials and special articles” in American journals proclaim the view that the Allies will win the war. Bet they wouldn’t have been described as brilliant if they had concluded likewise - The official number of British casualties since the start of the war edges towards the half a million mark – page 9 - Erstwhile Gallipoli commander Sir Ian Hamilton received a hearty send-off on his departure, it is reported on page 9. Meanwhile there is the belated publication of the latest despatch from Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, it being six weeks old, on page 11 - The price of butter is predicted to fall as the Danish government arranges cheaper supplies – page 10 - A list of 19 German ships reported to have been sunk by British submarines in the Baltic is given on page 11. They all appear to be merchant ships, of the sort the paper would fulminate against German pirates if their British counterparts were sunk likewise - “Policewomen have come to stay” reports the women’s page on page 12. Next to this, among the recipes on the page this week is braised stuffed cabbage.

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