23rd November 1915
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23rd November 1915







Corporal Alfred George Drake of the 8 Rifle Brigade was part of a four-man patrol sent out into no man’s land o the night of 23 November. The patrol was discovered when it was illuminated by an enemy flare and came under heavy fire, Lt Tryon, the officer in command of the patrol and one rifleman were shot and wounded almost instantly. Corporal Drake ordered the surviving rifleman to drag the wounded soldier back to the British lines; Lt Tryon wounds were more serious and needed immediate medical attention so Drake remained with his officer tending his wounds.






his citation reads: For most conspicuous bravery on the night of 23rd Nov., 1915, near La Brique, France. He was one of a patrol of four which was reconnoitring towards the German lines. The patrol was discovered when close to the enemy who opened heavy fire with rifles and a machine gun, wounding the Officer and one man. The latter was carried back by the last remaining man. Corporal Drake remained with his Officer and was last seen kneeling beside him and bandaging his wounds regardless of the enemy's fire. Later a rescue party crawling near the German lines found the Officer and Corporal, the former unconscious but alive and bandaged, Corporal Drake beside him dead and riddled with bullets. He had given his own life and saved his Officer.

In todays' Daily Telegraph: - Page 4 is given over to National Book Fortnight, and for the first time since its publication the previous month you’ll find mention of one of the year’s most famous novels, John Buchan’s The Thirty-Nine Steps, in the paper. On page 11 you can read about the most popular book in Berlin, which imagines a triumphal entry of the Germans into London
- One of “several chapters in the record of women’s war work yet to be written” is covered on page 5 with an account of the buffets for soldiers provided at London Victoria station. Inversely, an article on page 7 covers canteens for women munition workers
- The War Office announces regulation on Christmas mail to the troops, which had to be limited “in military interests” – page 5
- A “well-known boxer” is court-martialled for inciting men in his platoon to mutiny and refusing to go on parade – page 5 - The banner headline on page 9 speaks of a “Pacific blockade of Greece” which sounds a tad hard to enforce, and doesn’t really relate to any of the articles on the current situation there, including more on Lord Kitchener’s visit - The fighting by French forces in the Balkans is documented by G. Ward Price on pages 9 and 10 - The official list of occupations from which recruits are not to be drawn under the Earl of Derby’s scheme takes up a fair portion of page 10 - The Italians report racing “veritable hurricanes of shells” in an article on page 10 - The tale of how Lieutenant-Commander Layton of submarine E13 escaped from internment in Denmark is copied from the Liverpool Courier – page 11 .

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