24th November 1915
Gallery Solace - The Great War 1914-1918
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THE GREAT WAR BLOG

24th November 1915




In todays' Daily Telegraph: Serbia was still dominating the news, with two major articles and several smaller ones on page 9 alone today. A delayed despatch from G. J. Stevens about Monastir led the way, a “vivid story of Serbia’s struggle” proclaimed the banner headline, whilst he painted a further “sombre picture” in a later despatch. Add in the next part of G. Ward Price’s despatch about the French forces fighting there, which continued on to page 10, and Telegraph readers had plenty to digest about the situation there. Also in today’s paper - A bit of a curious choice of Christmas card by King George V, in a picture of the 1591 action in which the Revenge took on a whole Spanish fleet, for whilst it was a gallant stand, it still lost (page 3) - In aid of National Book Fortnight W. L. Courtney waxes lyrical about the joys of reading fiction – page 4 - An article on page 7 assesses what would be sensible economies in war time - “No Greek ships are being seized or held up in the ports of the United Kingdom, and no blockade of Greek ports has been instituted or is in force” claims the Foreign Office on page 9, despite what has been reported over the last two days - The postponement of the Parliament and Registration Bill suggests there are some difficulties to be resolved with this legislation – page 9 - Theatre managers will be permitted to allow smoking at weekends in their venues – page 9 - A witness is missing from the trial of a German plotter in America, whilst the prosecution implicates the German embassy in the affair – page 10 - Lord Derby fells an American journalist of his belief that there are “few slackers now” – page 10 - American jockey Tod Sloan is detained and ordered to be deported under the provisions of the Defence of the Realm act, whilst a French actress is also held, in a situation which causes “considerable surprise” in London – page 10. No explanation is given as to why - “No beer, no work” is the slogan as opposition grows to the latest liquor restrictions in London – page 11 - A claim is made on page 11 that in two days at Loos the Germans lost 80% of their men, “higher than ever hoped for.” Imagine the derision that would be heaped upon an German claim of that nature - A British airman turns the tables after engine trouble means his plane is captured in “an extraordinary story” on page 11


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