3rd December 1915
Gallery Solace - The Great War 1914-1918
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3rd December 1915



In todays Daily Telegraph: “There is no Government in Europe so highly paid as that of this country” observes an analysis of Government spending on page 9 today, which reveals the costs of various departments and individuals. It turned out that the highest individual sum, £20,000, was paid to the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, a figure matched with fees by the Attorney-General. Whilst the Telegraph wished to “utter no word of criticism of the occupants of these offices” it was not impressed in a leader on page 8, wondering whether such figures were appropriate at a time of calls for economy and even whether they “represent value received by the nation,” wondering whether a figure six times as much as that received by the Commander of the Grand Fleet (Sir John Jellicoe) whose responsibility was immense at this time was appropriate. The leader indeed goes on to describe the cost of Government as “excessively costly” and clearly hoped that retrenchment would start at the top.
Presumably the Government’s acceptance of a horse-racing stud and training establishment (page 9) will only add to this bill.
Also in today’s paper
- All of page 4 and part of page 5 is turned over to ideas for Christmas books
- The Belgium fund, now over 13 months’ old, tops the 3 million shillings mark – page 7 - George Bernard Shaw says peace is out the question until Germany is defeated, as otherwise it would mean “a tremendous triumph for the German army and its prestige, which we were out to combat” – page 7 - Mainly through announcements in Italy, it seems that the Allies and Greece are reaching some sort of concord – page 9 - Henry Ford’s attempt to send a peace ship to Europe is attracting derision in America before it has even set sail – page 9 - A Special Correspondent on page 10 paints a grim picture of what has been captured from the Russians by the Central Powers, almost as if to give the impression it has been nothing of worth. - A letter writer on page 10 denounces as “monstrous” the penalty of a £100 fine and six months’ hard labour to those breaching the liquor control restrictions - Sweden reaffirms her neutrality, despite a grouping called the Activists calling on her to enter on the side of the Central Powers – page 10 - 


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