11th December 1915
Gallery Solace - The Great War 1914-1918
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11th December 1915










In todays Daily Telegraph: “The German nation is longing for peace with its whole heart.” A leader on page 8 draws an unlikely-sounding conclusion from the debate in the Reichstag on peace conditions, which apparently arrived too late for the previous day’s paper and thus appears on page 9 today, and goes on to argue that “an intelligent people cannot face with any satisfaction the indefinite continuance of a struggle every additional day of which makes matters worse,” but their deluded rulers are so convinced of victory that they are unable to do the right thing by their countrymen. “Meanwhile our statesmen spare us such enthusiastic assurances of our own invincibility as the Imperial Chancellor still thinks likely to inspirit his now rather pensive countrymen,” it goes on to claim, which would be all well and good, but how many setbacks have been camouflaged so far by the Allies, and how often have we heard statesmen and indeed the Telegraph talk of victory being a foregone conclusion for them? What’s the difference? Indeed, it could be argued that what the Telegraph’s leader has to say about Bethmann-Hollweg and what Bethmann-Hollweg had to say in the Reichstag about the Allies are but two sides of a same coin… Also in today’s paper - “How many of us, I wonder, have given even so much as a thought to Serbia as a musical nation,” writes Robin H. Legge on page 4, a sentiment which could well be equally valid a century on. He does manage to fill the best part of a column on the subject nevertheless - Some modesty from one of the British escapees from Serbia in a letter on page 4, in which he ascribes leadership of his party to somebody else. A. Beaumont in Milan has more tales of the “terrible plight of Serbian fugitives” to tell on page 7 - The superiority in weight of munitions for Britain in the Western Front is described as the triumph of the business man on page 7. A member of the Executive Council of the Amalgamated Society of Tailors and Tailoresses isn’t so happy about the effect of the Government’s munitions policy on his trade in a letter on the same page though - “Severe repulses of Bulgar attacks” comes the latest report from Macedonia on page 9, but the announcement that the French have completed their retirement suggests the Allies are still on the back foot. Not that the French report it that way, claiming that as “the Serbian army for the moment is out of the reckoning, our presence on Serbian territory is no longer necessary” so that is why the retirement took place - Another bumper crop of reports as Lord Derby’s recruitment scheme nears its conclusion on pages 9 and 10 - The women’s page provides advice on Christmas pudding making in straitened times – page 12


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